Rewilding at Knepp Estate: Our Walking Safari Experience

This September, we took the opportunity to thank our volunteers and staff for their hard work and dedication, with a long-awaited trip to see the fantastic rewilding project at Knepp Estate, south of Horsham. The estate was originally used for intensive farming, until 2001 when the owners took the bold decision to end farming, reintroduce grazing animals, and allow the land to return to a natural state. The resulting transformation has been a huge success, so it was exciting to be able to go on their walking safari, and also take a look at where an infamous native species will be reintroduced, later this year.

Volunteers © 2020 Nicola Timney

Our members were split into small groups and allocated a knowledgeable and enthusiastic guide, to tour different areas of the site. A buzzard circled above, as the guides detailed which large, yet elusive, herbivores could be seen on the walk. Longhorn Cattle, Exmoor Ponies and Red Deer were present, plus Tamworth Pigs and Fallow Deer, which our groups were lucky enough to see, had all been introduced as a key part of the rewilding process. Without their grazing, a closed canopy forest would overtake the estate, yet it is the mixture of tall woodland and low-lying scrubland at Knepp which make it so biodiverse.

White Stork nest © 2020 Nicola Timney

On route to the first stop, a large white stork nest was seen high in the tree tops. Our guide explained that two young storks had built the nest within a week – an incredible achievement due its size! While the pair did not successfully breed, it was a good sign that the area is continuing to attract these birds. Knepp is part of the White Stork Project, and currently house a small colony of 20 rescue storks, which can no longer fly due to previous injuries. The hope is that other storks spot the small group and choose to breed with them and stay locally, which will improve the genetic diversity of the colony and help secure the future of the species.

A young Oak tree growing out the top of the scrub © 2020 Nicola Timney

The next area of scrubland shown, was a fantastic example of rapid rewilding. Within 15 years, seeds from the surrounding hedgerows had been trapped by the hooves of cattle, and deposited in droppings, which then spread and germinated across the farmland. The vegetation had grown into large domed shapes, which proved to be a popular and safe nesting place for linnets, whitethroats, and many other birds.

A tree was often spotted growing out of the top of these vegetation ‘domes’, with oak being the most commonly found tree at Knepp. Forgotten acorns, which had been buried with surrounding greenery, were later protected from being eaten by deer, as the growing brambles create a defensive ‘skirt’ around the saplings. Some may find them unsightly, but we love how these un-kempt shrubs support biodiversity!

Speckled Wood butterfly © 2020 Nicola Timney

The staff at Knepp Estate shared their experience of the benefits of minimal land management. In particular, they found that by not trimming back hedges, new growth would continue to appear. This is especially important for the declining brown hairstreak butterfly, which lays its eggs on the new shoots of blackthorn hedgerows. Unlike traditional conservation methods, which can need a lot of human involvement, this simple method of leaving hedges untrimmed where possible, is an easy and cheap management strategy to try at home and in public spaces.

A notable feature of the land was the uneven ground, where the Tamworth pigs had been rooting. The unearthing of seeds, which then germinate in the disrupted ground, had enabled wildflowers to grow all over the estate. These buds and small leaves seem to be a favoured food source for Turtle doves in the area. Nationally, Turtle doves are expected to become extinct within a few years, so the staff hope to tag the doves and track their movements and feeds, to prove that reintroducing pigs to other areas in the UK could help the species.

Lightning-Struck tree © 2020 Nicola Timney

The main lesson learned on the trip, was to remember to always be untidy where possible! This beautiful lightning-struck tree would usually have been cleared, but keeping the tree and its debris has provided a fantastic habitat for insects. Try leaving out dead wood in your garden to naturally biodegrade overtime, or pile the wood into a bug hotel, to support insect popualtions. Our gardens make up more land than all the nature reserves in the UK put together, so you can make a real difference just by leaving areas of your garden less manicured.

Near the end of the safari tour, our members were shown an area with ditches and rivers, which will soon become home to European beavers, relocated from a reintroduction program in Scotland. The beavers are expected to make use of the abundant young willow growing near Knepp’s watercourses, which in turn will allow light-loving and oxygenating plants to thrive in the water. In fact, the beavers will be managing the land much like our volunteers do for our Fixing and Linking Our Wetlands Project. We can’t wait to return next year and see how the landscape has changed!

Volunteers © 2020 Nicola Timney

Our team send a big thank you to Knepp Estate for a wonderful tour and an interesting insight into different land management strategies. The site is 3,500 acres, so there is lots more to see on our next trip, and we highly recommend that you visit!

Learn more about Knepp Estate on their website: www.knepp.co.uk/home


Post by Nicola Timney

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Tool Maintenance Session for the FLOW Project

The Project

FLOW (Fixing and Linking Our Wetlands) is a Heritage Lottery Funded Project to survey and improve the ditch network of the Manhood Peninsula, to prevent flooding and increase vital habitat for wildlife. FLOW works in the following parishes: Apuldram, Donnington, Earnley, East Wittering, Bracklesham, Hunston, North Mundham, Selsey, Sidlesham, West Wittering, West Itchenor and Birdham.

Activity

Before starting a season of habitat improvement work, we meet up with our volunteers to clean, sharpen and oil our tools. We will provide refreshments to enjoy while we chat and work, but please bring your own cups and cutlery (spoons) for your personal use. This work party will take place outdoors, socially distanced, and with tools carefully allocated. Gloves, lots of antibacterial spray, hand sanitiser, and wipes, will be available.

The site has some stinging nettles so covered shoes are recommended. Please bring warm clothing, and bring a fold up chair if you have one.

We really need your help with this work and appreciate any time you can give.

Due to COVID-19, our team leaders will need to keep track of the numbers of attendees. Please RSVP to this event, using the contact form below, to book a place. Please note that outdoor activities are subject to change, due to weather conditions and unforeseen circumstances. Attendees will be notified of any changes via email.

Location

Parking is onsite at Campbell’s field – next to the FLOW container – see map below. The entrance to the field will be marked with a hi vis jacket and is just past the Biotecture entrance, 118 Batchmere Lane, Almodington PO20 7LE

Contact Us

Book a place at an event or send the organisers a message for more information.


Subscribed volunteers, who sign up to receive all volunteering news and upcoming events, can RSVP to events through our emails and will be notified of relevant updates or cancellations.


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August’s Results: Find Wildlife From Home Survey

While August was not a predictable month for the weather, our volunteers were reliable in recording and submitting their wildlife sightings. In the fifth month of our survey, a total of 69 records were submitted!

We now have volunteers regularly contributing their wildlife sightings, seen at FLOW project improved wetland sites – it’s great to see the results of your landscaping work supporting a wide range of species. Well done to all who braved the wild weather to carry out their surveys, last month!

If you are interested in wildlife recording, our FLOW project team are currently looking for volunteers to independently survey the following sites:

~ Rymans House pond in Apuldram
~ Easton Lane at the Sidlesham/ Earnley parish border
~ The relic canal in NorthMundham

Contact us at flow@mwhg.org.uk to learn more about independent surveying.


Read August’s survey results, below: 

 

Species 

No. 

Seen 

Blackbird, Turdus merula 

Blue tit, Cyanistes caeruleus 

Buff-tailed Bumblebee, Bombus terrestris 

12 

Collared Dove, Streptopelia decaocto 

Common blue butterfly, Polyommatus icarus 

Common carder bee, Bombus pascuorum 

Common soldier beetle, Rhagonycha fulva 

Dunnock, Prunella modularis 

Gatekeeper, Pyronia tithonus 

Goldfinch, Carduelis carduelis 

12 

Grass moth, Chrysoteuchia culmella 

Great spotted woodpecker, Dendrocopos major 

Green Shieldbug nymph, Palomena prasina 

Holly Blue, Celastrina argiolus 

House Sparrow, Passer domesticus 

Hoverfly, (Syrphida family) 

20 

Ladybird, (Coccinellidae family) 

20 

Large White butterfly, Pieris brassicae 

11 

Linnet, Carduelis cannabina 

Long-bodied Hoverfly, Sphaerophoria scripta 

Magpie moth, Abraxas grossulariata 

Meadow Brown, Maniola jurtina 

Mint moth, Pyrausta aurata 

Mining bee, (Andrenidae family) 

Nursery web spider, Pisaura mirabilis 

Peacock butterfly, Aglais io 

Red Admiral, Vanessa atalanta 

Robin, Erithacus rubecula 

Silver Y moth, Autographa gamma 

Small White, Pieris rapae 

Speckled wood butterfly, Pararge aegeria 

Tapered Drone fly, Eristalis pertinax 

Wood pigeon, Columba palumbus 

7-spot Ladybird, Coccinella septempunctata 


Check out the photos we received: 

 

Keep sending in your submissions, and if you haven’t taken part already, please share your sightings with us – every record received helps us build a more accurate picture of the Manhood Peninsula*.

How can I get involved with this survey?

Sending us a record of your wildlife sightings is simple, just make a note of the date and location of the sighting, and use these notes to fill out our ‘Enter a Quick Wildlife Record’ form. You can also submit a photo through this form.

Enter a Quick Wildlife Record

Alternatively, you can upload multiple records at the same time, by filling in one of our recording sheets and submitting this through our ‘Upload Multiple Wildlife Records’ form.

Upload Multiple Wildlife Records
Wildlife Recording Sheet View Printable PDF
Wildlife Recording Sheet Download Fillable Form

*This survey is specifically receiving submissions of wildlife sightings seen on the Manhood Peninsula, below Chichester, which includes: Apuldram, Donnington, Earnley, East Wittering, Bracklesham, Hunston, North Mundham, Selsey, Sidlesham, West Wittering, South Mundham, plus West Itchenor and Birdham.

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Dusk Bat Survey in South Mundham

The Project

FLOW (Fixing and Linking Our Wetlands) is a Heritage Lottery Funded Project to survey and improve the ditch network of the Manhood Peninsula, to prevent flooding and increase vital habitat for wildlife. FLOW works in the following parishes: Apuldram, Donnington, Earnley, East Wittering, Bracklesham, Hunston, North Mundham, Selsey, Sidlesham, West Wittering, West Itchenor and Birdham.

Activity

Field Officer, Chris Drake, will be hosting an evening bat survey at Camic pond. This habitat has previously been improved by our wonderful volunteers, so hopefully we will detect bats in the area. This survey will be held in one location, so please bring along a comfortable chair to use for the duration of the event. Please bring your own earphones/ headphones to use with our bat detectors, and remember to bring your own filled water bottle and additional warm clothing.

Due to COVID-19, some of our events and volunteering activities will have a limited number of spaces. Attendees must RSVP to this event, using the contact form below, to book a place. Please note that outdoor activities are subject to change, due to weather conditions and unforeseen circumstances. Attendees will be notified of any changes via email.

Location

Camic Pond, junction of Punches Lane (South Mundham PO20 1LU) and Runcton Lane (South Mundham PO20 1LT). 

Parking available at the farmyard on the corner of Punches Lane and Manor Lane (look out for the hi viz jacket on the gate to the farmyard).

Contact Us

Book a place at an event or send the organisers a message for more information.


Subscribed volunteers, who sign up to receive all volunteering news and upcoming events, can RSVP to events through our emails and will be notified of relevant updates or cancellations.


Become a Volunteer

Subscribe as a volunteer to hear about our upcoming volunteering opportunities, social events and workshops

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75th Anniversary of VJ Day: Stories from the War Memorials

Sidlesham

 

On the Sidlesham War Memorial are the names of two Brothers, Charles Frederick Dowdy and Harry Ernest Dowdy. Both brothers were in the Royal Navy.

Charles Dowdy died in the sinking of HMS Barham in November 1941, which we previously wrote about in our post ‘The Names on the War Memorial: Selsey 1939-1945′.

Harry was killed in February 1942 when HMS Scorpion, a river gunboat, was sunk by a Japanese destroyer off Sumatra.

Scorpion was an armed river boat of the dragonfly class. Her sister ship was the HMS Locust.

HMS LOCUST (FL 1677) Underway. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205120193
HMS Dragonfly, Scorpion and Locust were all lost in the same incident.

Reports that HMS Scorpion was sunk somewhere in the vicinity of Muntok (Banka Island) near Singapore, were from another vessel, ‘The Mata Hari’, which picked up five of the Scorpion’s crew who had been swimming in the water for over five hours. The Mata Hari surrendered to the Japanese later that night at the mouth of the Moesi river, which flows into Palembang. Reportedly, 42 of the 47 ships that left Singapore that night were sunk. The actual specifics of the Scorpion’s demise appear to be that she was damaged by aircraft on February 9th 1942 and later sunk by a Japanese destroyer at the Banka Straits three to four days later.

~

Reginald Makeham [Photo source: www.commandoveterans.org], on the Sidlesham War Memorial, was a private in 6 Troop Number 2 Commando The Gordon Highlanders. He took part in Operation Musketoon in 1942.

Operation Musketoon was a raid on an electricity generating station at Glomfjord, in German occupied Norway. Ten Commandos from No 2 Commando and 2 Norwegian corporals working for the SOE took part in the raid leaving their home port on the 11th September. They were taken by submarine to a remote Fjord, completed a difficult overland route and approached their target from the rear. Having evacuated the Norwegian workers first, they set explosive charges and blew up the plant, successfully destroyed it.

Seven of them were captured, while 3 escaped to Sweden, which was neutral territory. The captured commandos, including Reginald, were taken to Germany and held at Colditz Castle for a time, where they were later executed at Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp under Hitler’s infamous Commando Order, an executive order that all captured commandos should be executed. The Germans told the Red Cross the commandos had escaped and not been recaptured to cover up their murder.

The story only emerged during the Nuremberg War Crimes Tribunal.

Why is a Gordon Highlander on the Sidlesham War Memorial? Because his mother, Mary, was living at 6 The Terrace in Sidlesham, during the war.

Glomfjord Hydroelectric Power Plant © Matti Paavola. Source: www.tracesofwar.com

The War in the Far East

Jack Warnock died October 9th 1943

Gordon Hardy Perry died March 3rd 1945

George Thomas Wilkins died April 9th 1945

All three of these Selsey men were enlisted in the Royal Artillery.

George Wilkins was posted to Singapore in early 1941, and Gordon Perry and Jack Warnock were also posted to Singapore, and were in a convoy of ships that arrived on February 15th 1942, just as the city fell to the Japanese.

Japan refused to sign the Geneva Convention on prisoners of war. The prisoners rarely received Red Cross parcels, and they were in fact slowly starved to death. In the meantime, the Japanese authorities made them send home pre-printed postcards which suggested to their families that they were all right.

As prisoners of the Japanese, Gordon and George were sent to work on the notorious Burma railway and Jack was held in a POW camp in Thailand. The families heard nothing of them until 1945, when it was discovered that Jack had died of malnutrition and Beriberi disease (vitamin b deficiency) in 1943. Gordon survived into 1945, but was beaten by the guards, and was so debilitated by Beriberi and malnutrition he died of his wounds. George was killed whilst on a train being transported to a new camp. The train was attacked by USAAF planes and he was killed by a bomb, along with many other prisoners of war.

16,000 Allied troops died building the Burma railway. British, Dutch, Australian and Americans were forced to work under armed guard.

Burma Railway Memorial Plaque © 2018 Andrew Ruppenstein. Source: The Historical Marker Database https://www.hmdb.org/
Burma Railway Memorial © 2007 Mark Wilson. Source: www.flickr.com

Itchenor

John Harker was a lieutenant in the Royal Artillery attached to the 301st Field Regiment, East African Artillery. He died, aged 29, when the SS Khedive Ismail was torpedoed by the Japanese Submarine I-27, in the Indian Ocean on February 12th 1944. Son of Philip and Barbara Harker of Itchenor, and husband of Mrs Daphne Harker of Hampstead, he is commemorated on The East Africa Memorial, Kenya.

On February 5th 1944,  Khedive Ismail sailed from Mombasa heading for Colombo. On board were 1,324 passengers, 996 of which were members of the East African Artillery’s 301st Field Regiment. As part of  the Convoy, KR 8,  Khedive Ismail was escorted by the Hawkins-class heavy cruiser HMS Hawkins and P-class destroyers HMS Paladin and HMS Petard. 

On February 12th the KR 8 convoy had reached the One and a Half Degree Channel, south-west of the Maldives, but was spotted by the Japanese submarine I-27. While the I-27 took Khedive Ismail’s position, a lookout sighted I-27’s periscope and raised the alarm. Khedive Ismail’s DEMS gunners opened fire on the submarine, as the I-27 returned four torpedoes, two of which hit Khedive Ismail.

THE DESTROYER HMS PETARD AT SEA, DECEMBER 1943 (A 21715) The destroyer HMS PETARD at speed. As seen from the carrier HMS FORMIDABLE. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205119793
HMS PALADIN (FL 9423) Underway Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205120765

The severe damage to her stern led to the ship sinking in only three minutes. Paladin lowered boats to rescue survivors, some of which were able to utilise floats that had floated away from the sunken ship.

Petard retaliated, releasing depth charges which forced the I-27 to the surface. The smaller Paladin reinforced the counter attack, which lasted two and a half hours. After Paladin suffered a gash to the hull while retreating, the I-27 took the opportunity to submerge under the dead and remaining survivors on the surface. The I-27 was finally destroyed after Petard released 7 torpedoes, sinking all on the submarine. Sadly, the continued attack on the I-27 killed more survivors from Khedive Ismail. From SS Khedive Ismail, only 208 men and 6 women survived the sinking and subsequent battle. It was recognised to be the largest loss of servicewomen, 77 in total, in the history of the Commonwealth, and the third largest loss of life from Allied ships during the war.

Brothers in Arms

 

To lose one son or daughter in a war is bad enough, but some families lost more than one. Here are the names of the brothers, cousins, a nephew, and an uncle, who were lost across the Manhood Peninsula.

Some are remembered in the road names in Selsey, remember them if you drive or walk up Hunnisett Close, Pennycord Close, or Donaldson Close.

(Siblings)

Alfred Percy Fullick August 1940

Frederick Roy Fullick May 1941

(their cousin)

Edward George (Jack) Fullick April 1942

~

(Siblings)

Leslie Egbers November 1942

Peter Egbers December 1943

~

(Siblings)

Donald Harry Hunnisett August 1943

Dick Hunnisett July 1944

~

(Cousins)

Jack Pennycord October 1939

Bert Pennycord April 1943

~

(Nephew and Uncle)

Louis Mitchell May 1940

Ernest Mitchell September 1943

~

(Siblings)

Lionel Perry July 1942

Gorden Perry March 1945

~

(Siblings)

Kenneth Edwards April 1944

George Edwards November 1944

~

(Siblings)

Charles Dowdy November 1942

Harry Dowdy February 1942


Post by Dr Lesley Bromley

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July’s Results: Find Wildlife From Home Survey

In the fourth month of our Find Wildlife From Home Survey, we surpassed 200 submissions! Some of these sightings were recorded at FLOW project improved wetland sites, by volunteers working independently. Thank you to those who have already signed up to return to surveying wildlife for the FLOW project, your time and efforts are really appreciated! Contact us at flow@mwhg.org.uk to learn more about independent surveying.

Read July’s survey results, below: 

 

Species 

No. 

Seen 

Blue-tailed Damselfly (Ischnura elegans) 

3 

Brown-lipped Snail (Cepaea nemoralis) 

1 

Blackbird (Turdus merula) 

2 

Blackcap (Sylvia atricapilla) 

1 

Blue-tailed Damselfly (Ischnura elegans) 

1 

Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) 

1 

Buff tailed bee (Bombus terrestris) 

7 

Buzzard (Buteo buteo) 

1 

Collared Dove (Streptopelia decaocto) 

1 

Comma Butterfly (Polygonia c-album) 

1 

Common Carder Bee (Bombus pascuorum) 

4 

Common Whitethroat (Sylvia communis) 

1 

Dunnock (Prunella modularis) 

1 

Elephant hawk-moth (Deilephila elpenor) 

3 

Fox (Vulpes vulpes) 

1 

Gatekeeper (Pyronia tithonus) 

20 

Goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis) 

13 

German Wasp (Vespula germanica) 

2 

House Martin (Delichon urbicum) 

20 

House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) 

3 

Hoverfly (Various) (Syrphidae family) 

15 

Ichneumonidae Wasp (Pimpla rufipes) 

1 

Large White butterfly (Pieris brassicae) 

7 

Meadow Brown butterfly (Maniola jurtina) 

8 

Mining bee (Andrena species) 

1 

Patchwork leaf-cutter bee (Megachile centuncularis) 

1 

Red Admiral butterfly (Vanessa atalanta) 

3 

Red slug (Arion rufus) 

2 

Robber fly (Dioctria baumhaueri) 

1 

Robin (Erithacus rubecula) 

4 

Wood Mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) 

1 

Wood Pigeon (Columba palumbus) 

5 

Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes) 

2 

Six-Spot Burnet moth (Zygaena filipendulae) 

2 

Skipper butterfly (Hesperiidae family) 

1 

Small White Butterfly (Pieris rapae) 

1 

Speckled Wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria) 

3 

Yellowhammer (Emberiza citrinella) 

2 

7-Spot Ladybird (Coccinella septempunctata) 

17 

These wonderful photos were also submitted, during July:

 

 

Keep sending in your submissions, and if you haven’t taken part already, please share your sightings with us – every record received helps us build a more accurate picture of the Manhood Peninsula*.

How can I get involved with this survey?

Sending us a record of your wildlife sightings is simple, just make a note of the date and location of the sighting, and use these notes to fill out our ‘Enter a Quick Wildlife Record’ form. You can also submit a photo through this form.

Enter a Quick Wildlife Record

Alternatively, you can upload multiple records at the same time, by filling in one of our recording sheets and submitting this through our ‘Upload Multiple Wildlife Records’ form.

Upload Multiple Wildlife Records
Wildlife Recording Sheet View Printable PDF
Wildlife Recording Sheet Download Fillable Form

*This survey is specifically receiving submissions of wildlife sightings seen on the Manhood Peninsula, below Chichester, which includes: Apuldram, Donnington, Earnley, East Wittering, Bracklesham, Hunston, North Mundham, Selsey, Sidlesham, West Wittering, South Mundham, plus West Itchenor and Birdham.

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Spring Summer Newsletter 2020

This year’s spring summer newsletter is now out!

Our newsletter team has collated great stories and photos from our members and volunteers – thank you to those who contributed to this edition, despite the unusual and difficult events impacting us all this year.

Included in this newsletter are articles on VE day, updates from the Community Wildlife Officer and FLOW project leader, interesting wildlife sightings, plus handy bumblebee identification tips from the FLOW team’s bee expert.

View the Spring/ Summer 2020 Newsletter


You can read our previous newsletters on our website’s newsletter archive.

Subscribe to our Newsletter

If you would like to be notified when our newsletters are released, sign up below!

* indicates required




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June’s Results: Find Wildlife From Home Survey

We are now into our third month of our Find Wildlife From Home Survey, and the submissions keep coming in! June brought even more hot weather to the peninsula, allowing our followers to record sightings both at home and further afield.

Read June’s submissions, below:

Species  Individuals 
Angle shades (Phlogophora meticulosa)  1 
Blackbird (Turdus merula)  6 
Black garden ant (Lasius niger)  20 
Blue-tailed Damselfly (Ischnura elegans)  1 
Buff-tailed Bumblebee (Bombus terrestris)  5 
Crane fly (Tipula oleracea)  2 
Dunnock (Prunella modularis)  3 
Fox (Vulpes vulpes)  4 
Goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis)  15 
Hawthorn Shieldbug (Acanthosoma haemorrhoidale)  1 
Hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus)  5 
Holly Blue (Celastrina argiolus)  3 
House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)  6 
Hoverfly (Diplazon laetatorius)  1 
Hoverfly (Myathropa florea)  1 
Hoverfly (Syrphus ribesii)  2 
Hoverfly (Volucella zonaria)  1 
Kestrel (Falco tinnunculus)  1 
Magpie (Pica pica)  1 
Mason wasp (Ancistrocerus gazella)  1 
Migrant Hoverfly (Eupeodes corollae)  1 
Mirid Bug (Deraeocoris flavilinea)  1 
Red Admiral butterfly (Vanessa atalanta)  1 
Robin (Erithacus rubecula) 1 
Semaphore fly (Poecilobothrus nobilitatus)  1 
Speckled wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria)  3 
Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) 1 
Thick-legged flower beetle (Oedemera nobilis)  1 
Vine weevil (Otiorhynchus sulcatus)  1 
Wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus)  2 
Wood Pigeon (Columba palumbus)  5 

 Take a look at the fantastic photos submitted in June:

Keep sending in your submissions, and if you haven’t taken part already, please share your sightings with us – every record received helps us build a more accurate picture of the Manhood Peninsula*.

How can I get involved with this survey?

Sending us a record of your wildlife sightings is simple, just make a note of the date and location of the sighting, and use these notes to fill out our ‘Enter a Quick Wildlife Record’ form. You can also submit a photo through this form.

Enter a Quick Wildlife Record

Alternatively, you can upload multiple records at the same time, by filling in one of our recording sheets and submitting this through our ‘Upload Multiple Wildlife Records’ form.

Upload Multiple Wildlife Records
Wildlife Recording Sheet View Printable PDF
Wildlife Recording Sheet Download Fillable Form

*This survey is specifically receiving submissions of wildlife sightings seen on the Manhood Peninsula, below Chichester, which includes: Apuldram, Donnington, Earnley, East Wittering, Bracklesham, Hunston, North Mundham, Selsey, Sidlesham, West Wittering, South Mundham, plus West Itchenor and Birdham.

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May’s Results: Find Wildlife From Home Survey

Our followers have been busy recording for the second month of our Find Wildlife From Home Survey, and we have now surpassed 100 submissions in total! Volunteers have also been borrowing the live-moth trap from FLOW project leader, Jane, to do moth counting from home alone, whilst others are helping to create GIS maps of data from our ditch surveys – thank you for helping us to collate and collect data on the Manhood Peninsula, during the lockdown period.

With a record breaking warm transition into Summer, it has been interesting to see which species you spotted during May. Here are the results of last month’s submissions:

Species

Individuals

Bat (Other) 

1 

Bee-fly (Bombylius major) 

1 

Blackbird (Turdus merula) 

6 

Buff Ermine moth (Spilosoma luteum) 

1 

Buff-tailed bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) 

15 

Common carder bee (Bombus pascuorum) 

12 

Dunnock (Prunella modularis) 

3 

False Widow Spider (Steatoda grossa/ nobilis) 

1 

Field Cuckoo Bee (Bombus campestris) 

1 

Field Digger Wasp (Mellinus arvensis) 

1 

Flesh fly (Sarcophaga genus) 

1 

Goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis) 

12 

Great Tit (Parus major) 

2 

Greenfinch (Carduelis chloris) 

1 

Green-vein White (Pieris napi) 

1 

Hawthorn Shieldbug (Acanthosoma haemorrhoidale) 

1 

Hedgehog (Erinaceinae) 

1 

Holly Blue Butterfly (Celastrina argiolus) 

1 

Honey bee (Apis mellifera) 

8 

House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) 

12 

Hoverfly (Parhelophilus genus) 

2 

Hoverfly (Other) 

10 

Jumping Spider (Pseudeuophrys lanigera) 

1 

Juniper Sheildbug (Cyphostethus tristriatus) 

1 

Large Red Damselfly (Pyrrhosoma nymphula) 

1 

Magpie (Pica pica) 

2 

Marmalade Hoverfly (Episyrphus balteatus) 

6 

Mint moth (Pyrausta aurata) 

2 

Orange Tip Butterfly (Anthocharis cardamines) 

1 

Peacock Butterfly (Aglais io) 

3 

Red Admiral Butterfly (Vanessa atalanta) 

1 

Robin (Erithacus rubecula) 

6 

Rose Aphid Greenfly (Macrosiphum rosae) 

Est. 100 

Small White butterfly (Pieris rapae) 

1 

Speckled Wood (Pararge aegeria) 

1 

Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) 

3 

Wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) 

1 

Wood Pigeon (Columba palumbus) 

15 

Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes) 

1 

Yellow-legged Mining bee (Andrena flavipes) 

9 

7-Spot Ladybird (Coccinella septempunctata) 

1 

10-Spot Ladybird (Adalia decempunctata) 

1 

These superb photos were also sent in throughout May:

Keep sending in your submissions, and if you haven’t taken part already, please share your sightings with us – every record received helps us build a more accurate picture of the Manhood Peninsula*.

How can I get involved with this survey?

Sending us a record of your wildlife sightings is simple, just make a note of the date and location of the sighting, and use these notes to fill out our ‘Enter a Quick Wildlife Record’ form. You can also submit a photo through this form.

Enter a Quick Wildlife Record

Alternatively, you can upload multiple records at the same time, by filling in one of our recording sheets and submitting this through our ‘Upload Multiple Wildlife Records’ form.

Upload Multiple Wildlife Records
Wildlife Recording Sheet View Printable PDF
Wildlife Recording Sheet Download Fillable Form

*This survey is specifically receiving submissions of wildlife sightings seen on the Manhood Peninsula, below Chichester, which includes: Apuldram, Donnington, Earnley, East Wittering, Bracklesham, Hunston, North Mundham, Selsey, Sidlesham, West Wittering, South Mundham, plus West Itchenor and Birdham.

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The Names on the War Memorial: Selsey 1939-1945

Alan Dennis Abery, died 13th April 1940

Alan was one of the first Selsey boys to enlist in the services, volunteering for the Navy. Alan was a stoker on HMS Cossack, which was patrolling off the Norwegian coast in the spring of 1940.

HMS Cossack was part of a force of destroyers that advanced up Narvik Fjord, in Northen Norway, to attack some Nazi destroyers that were sheltering there. The attack was successful, and HMS Cossack destroyed a shore mounted howitzer gun. Alan was killed in the exchange of fire. He was 18 years old.

HMS COSSACK (FL 7087) Under tow. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205120571

 

Fred Brown, died autumn 1941 

Fred was originally from Lincolnshire, he joined the Navy as a boy sailor, in 1926. He married Gertrude Lawrence in 1932 and came to live in Selsey. 

He chose to serve on submarines and was on HMS Triton when war broke out. He rose to the rank of Petty Officer, and in 1940 he was serving in the Mediterranean. He was due for home leave in the autumn and set off on HMS Tetrarch, which was a submarine returning to Portsmouth. It never arrived. In December 1941 the Admiralty officially announced Tetrarch was lost.  

The likely resting place of the submarine is thought to be off the coast of Sicily, where the Germans had laid a large mine field. 

HMS TETRARCH (FL 5702) Alongside the coaling jetty at Blyth. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205120475

 

The Fullick Brothers 

Alfred Percy Fullick, died 8th August 1940 

Alfred Fullick. Selsey Remembers 1939-1945 published by the Selsey Society in 1995

Percy was part of a large Selsey family. He joined the Navy aged 24 at the outbreak of war. 

An able seaman on HMS Wilna, he was doing costal work. His patrol boat came under heavy attack from Luftwaffe planes while south-east of the Isle of Wight. Percy was killed during the exchange, and is buried in the Haslar Naval Cemetery. 

 

Frederick Roy Fullick, died 25th April 1941 

Frederik Roy Fullick, source: www.hmshood.com

Fredrick was the youngest of the Fullick brothers and he joined the Navy as a boy sailor straight from school. In 1941 he was an able bodied seaman on the battlecruiser HMS Hood. On the 24th of May, HMS Hood and HMS Prince of Wales sighted the German Battle Ship Bismarck travelling with the cruiser Prince Eugen, in the North Atlantic between Greenland and Iceland. A battle commenced, the Hood was vastly out gunned by the Bismarck and was hit in the middle of the ship, which split in two and sank immediately with a loss of over 1200 lives, including Fred. He was just 20 years old. 

On the 27th of May, after a three day chase, the Bismarck was sunk approximately 200 miles west of the French port of Brest. 

In 2016 the ships bell of HMS Hood was retrieved from the wreck and is now in the National Museum of the Royal Navy in Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. The ship lies 1 and a half miles down in the Denmark Straight and the recovery was performed by a team using a remote vehicle. The recovery was organised by and funded by Paul G. Allen, the co-founder of Microsoft. It is a memorial to all who died. 

HMS Hood 1924. Photographer: Allan C. Green 1878 – 1954, Restoration: Adam Cuerden

 

George Cox, Charles Charrett, and Francis Hugh Twycross Raines, died 25th November 1941

George moved to Selsey with his parents when he was 10 years old. Like so many, he joined the Royal Navy as a boy sailor at 15 years of age. When the war broke out he was an experienced able seaman. He served in the Mediterranean in 1941 aboard HMS Barham, a battle ship.

On the 25th of November, she was steaming off the Libyan coast when she was attacked with 4 torpedoes fired at close range by a German U-boat. The 31,500 ton battleship turned on her side and sank in less than 5 minutes. Most of the crew, including George at 32 years of age, were lost. 

Charles Charrett,  whose parents had retired to Selsey was also a regular Navy man, having joined as a boy sailor. He had been posted to HMS Mohawk, which had been sunk by an Italian destroyer, but had been rescued. He was then posted to HMS Barham and, like George Cox, went down with her, aged 29.  

Frances Hugh Twycross Raines was known as Hugh. Originally from South Bersted, his family moved to Selsey. He was commissioned in the Royal Navy, and was serving on HMS Barham as a Pay Midshipman. He was 22 years old when the Barham was sunk. 

The 25th of November 1941 was a hard day for Selsey. 

All three of these men are on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

HMS Barham. Photographed during the mid-1930s, following her 1931-34 reconstruction. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph #NH 63077

Pathé News newsreel cameraman, John Turner, was aboard the adjacent HMS Valiant during the shocking sinking of HMS Barham, and captured the final moments of the ship on film. The footage can be watched on the British Pathé YouTube channel, here. Viewer discretion is advised.

 

John William (Jack) Donaldson, died 9th June 1940

Jack was the second of four Donaldson brothers who grew up in Selsey. He was a regular RAF pilot having taken a short service commission in 1931. He was in the No. 1 Fighter Squadron. In 1938 he was promoted to Squadron Leader, and in 1940 saw action with 263 Squadron in Norway. He received the Distinguished Service Order for gallantry, for shooting down 6 enemy planes and putting 8 more out of action. 

During a second tour in Norway, using the same old fashioned biplanes, the Gloster Gladiators were brought to an end by the evacuation of the British forces from Narvik, on the 3rd of June. The pilots and aircraft were embarked on HMS Glorious, on the way home the Glorious accompanied by the destroyers Acasta and Ardent, encountered the German warships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, a furious battle ensued and Glorious and the two destroyers were all sunk with great loss of life, including Jack. 

Gloster Gladiator. Photo taken by an employee of the British government prior to 1956. Source: www.wikipedia.com
HMS Glorious. U.S. Naval Historical Photograph #NH6079. Source: www.wikipedia.com

 

Peter Frank Kennard-Davies, died 10th August 1940 

Born and bought up in Selsey, Peter had become a naval cadet at 16 years old, but was turned down because of eyesight problems. At the outbreak of war he joined the RAF. On the 3rd of August 1940 he joined the No. 64 Squadron based at Kenley in Surrey flighting a spitfire. His plane LI039 was shot down over West Langdon, he managed to bale out and was rushed to the Royal Victoria Hospital but he died of his wounds on the 10th of August. 

He was 19 years old.  

One of ‘The Few’

 

John Alfred (Jack) Pennycord, died 14th October 1939 

Jack was a regular Navy man before the war. At the outbreak of war he was serving on HMS Royal Oak, which was moored at Scapa Flow. On the night of 13/14th October 1939, a Nazi submarine U-47 infiltrated the harbour and torpedoed the Royal Oak. 810 of the 1234 officers and men were killed, including Jack. He was 32 years old, and left a wife and two daughters, the second of which was born a month after he was killed. 

Scapa Flow is a natural harbour in the Orkney Islands, it was a major naval base for the British Navy in the second world war. 

HMS ROYAL OAK (FL 12252) Underway. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205120981

 

Louis Hall Mitchell, died 28th May 1940

Eric Henry Tadd, died between 21st May and 8th June 1940

These two young men were killed during the evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force from Dunkirk 

Louis had joined the army at 14 as a boy soldier, and had served in India. He left the army and came to live in Selsey, but when the war started he was called up, as he was on the army reserve list, to join his old regiment the Royal East Kent. The East Kent formed part of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF). On May 10th the Nazis invaded Holland and Belgium pushing the BEF back to the coast at Dunkirk, where on the 27th May the evacuation started. There were not enough ships to remove the soldiers, so small ships from all along the south coast, fishing boats, pleasure crafts, yachts set off to Dunkirk to rescue as many men as possible. Sadly Louis was killed before he could be rescued.

Eric Tadd was born in Selsey, and was a groundsman at the Selsey Golf Club when he was called up and joined the Royal Engineers. His division was one of the two left behind in France after Dunkirk. He was killed in a battle in the Somme region of northern France. His exact date of death was unknown. He is buried in the War graves Cemetery in Abbeville. 

DUNKIRK 26-29 MAY 1940 (NYP 68075) British troops line up on the beach at Dunkirk to await evacuation. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205194324
DUNKIRK 1940 (HU 41241) Three of the armada of ‘little ships’ which brought the men of the BEF from the shores in and around Dunkirk, to the safety of British warships and other vessels. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205083524

 

Donald Harry Woodhouse Hunnisett, died 5th April 1943

Harry Richard (Dick) Stuart Hunnisett, died 21st July 1944

The Hunnisetts were a well known Selsey family. They owned the beach huts which stood on the cliffs in front of the Marne Hotel at the end of Hillfield Road, and rented out pleasure boats. Don and his brother Dick lived for the sea, he enlisted in the Royal Navy in 1940, and served on the mine-sweeping flotilla working along the Channel Coast. 

On the night of the 4/5th of August 1943 he was on a trawler ‘Red Gauntlet’ patrolling with other craft off the Thames Estuary. They were attacked by 7 enemy E boats and the Red Gauntlet was sunk off Harwich.  

Don’s body was recovered and permission was given for him to be buried at Church Norton. His Funeral in St Peter’s Church was a very special occasion, symbolising a special tribute to the many lives lost at sea where no funeral could be held.  

Dick was the elder brother and at the outbreak of war he joined the RAF and became a sergeant air gunner in Bomber Command. He survived many hazardous raids on Germany. He was serving in the No. 90 Squadron, flying in Lancasters. Following D-day he was flying a raid into enemy territory and was shot down on the 21st July near Eindhoven in Holland. He is buried there.

Minesweepers under Attack, Thames Estuary, October 1940
John Alan Hamilton (1919–1993). Photo credit: Imperial War Museums

Post by Dr. Lesley Bromley

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